Science Explains Sexual Bonding

BLUESGUY:

Don’t'cha just love it when science tells us something we already know?  For instance, there’s a new study among identical twins that indicates the presence of a specific gene can predict how good of a husband a guy is likely to be.

In an article titled “Bonding Gene Could Help Men Stay Married ,” Hasse Walum, of the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm admitted that he had been studying rodents (voles) when he first determined that bonding among males was worth studying in humans, too.

Studies in voles have shown that the hormone vasopressin is released in the brain of males during mating ,” Walum explained. “Vasopressin activates the brain’s reward system, and you could say that mating-induced vasopressin release motivates male voles to interact with females they have mated with .”

Walum continues: “This is not a sexual motivation, but rather a sort of prolonged social motivation.” In other words, the more vasopressin in the brain, the more male voles want to stick around and mingle with the female after copulation is through. This effect “is more pronounced in the monogamous voles,” Walum noted.

I think they’re missing the point.

Doesn’t common sense enter into this, too? Women… uh… strike that. Not scientific. “Females” who have already shown “a willingness to mate” will of course find… uh… that Males are more likely to hang around hoping to mate again.

They didn’t have to study voles in Sweden to reach that conclusion.

They could find it by observing the patrons at any bar on any given Saturday night.

And it doesn’t even take personal experience. Just the knowledge that this particular “female” has mated before, is enough to make a great many of the males interested. Perhaps even hopeful.

SANGUINISTA:

I wonder if voles have the whole have this whole gender-specific interpretation disconnect thing going on that humans do?

Cause, see, what I noticed is that “In other words, the more vasopressin in the brain, the more male voles want to stick around and mingle with the female after copulation is through. This effect “is more pronounced in the monogamous voles,” Wallum noted”.

If the vasopressin is “mating-induced”, then obviously these “monogamous voles” are gettin’ some.  So the “mingling” after copulation is through is having some benefits for the vole dudes.  Assuming they like “mating”…

I wonder if vasopressin is coffee soluble?  Does it have a very strong taste?

Discuss Does Mating History Repeat Itself in the forum.

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